Remission

Dana Farber has a patient portal, where you can see your appointment and your lab results and send messages to your doctor. And they have a new feature now where you can read your doctor’s notes after your visit. These are the notes that your doctor puts into your record. Doctors have always done this. They are leaving information for themselves and for anyone else who might look back into your record. And now there is a new initiative afoot called Open Notes. I know about Open Notes because of my job at Yale Health. We have implemented this and call it “Shared Notes”. Interestingly, at Yale only 7% of patients are reading their notes.

For the most part notes are somewhat boring and a tad redundant. And this was as it should be. The idea is that your doctor would have shared what he wrote already. When I visited with a cardiologist last year he actually dictated his note while I sat there, and told me to let him know if he didn’t get something right. It was very interesting – and talk about transparency!

A few months ago I read my note from my visit with Dr, Munshi on January 18th (the notes are often not available right away so you have to remember to go back and read them) I saw something that caught my eye, this is what I read:

She is in remission both from symptoms point of view and Also from laboratory results.

Well, will you look at that, I am “in remission”.

I have to say that it does feel a bit different. The stem cell transplant is coming up on 3 years (3 years!) and I’ve been on maintenance therapy for two and a half years. Everything is moving along without much fuss. All good!

I have found myself feeling a bit cocky, well, not feeling cocky, but having some cocky thoughts – maybe I could take a break from treatment – which my intellectual mind knows is not wise nor possible. And there isn’t any reason to want to take a break, other than the biweekly bloodworm sticks, visits to Smilow and injections into my stomach (oh and the constipation, don’t forget about the constipation!). But, really, there is no need. And all it takes to burst my cocky bubble is to wonder about what would happen if I did take a break, and the numbers went up, and it was back, and back where I had to get more and different treatments. Thank you, no, I will stick with my boring schedule.

And that brings me around to why I will be walking in the MMRF Tri-State 5K Event on Sunday, June 10th. Multiple myeloma remains an incurable cancer, so we walk, and raise money and support great organizations like the MMRF in hopes of finding a cure. If you’d like to join my team on the walk (or donate) visit my page.

P.S. The co-founder of the MMRF, Kathy Giusti was highlighted in an article in the Wall Street Journal this weekend, “An Urgent Mission to Speed Progress Against Cancer”.

Giving Back

I’ve come a long way thanks to the miracle of modern science. But it’s not entirely a miracle – it is brilliant minds working hard and funding from people like you and me. As I am approaching the 2 year anniversary of my stem cell transplant I am feeling the need to give back. To raise money and awareness for those who have gone behind me and for the struggles (selfishly) that I will face down the road.

I am putting together a team to in the  Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) Team for Cures 5K Walk/Run. And I invite you to join me on June 11th in New Canaan or to make a small donation to help fund the research in hopes that some day there will be a cure for multiple myeloma.

I share the photo above, which I lovingly call “Cancer on the Beach”, remembering the stem cell transplant, not how hard it was – but how amazing it was.

Here’s the link to my fundraising page: https://walkrun.themmrf.org/Tri-State/heathersmith.

Thanks as always for checking in here.