Made of “Good Stuff”

Last week I had an appointment with my neurologist, because you know, I don’t go to enough doctor’s appointments!  Actually, I had to go because the stem cell harvesting process gives some people migraines, which I do get. Typically I handle my migraines with a combination of tylenol and advil. However I am currently not allowed to take advil, so off to the neurologist I went to get a prescription for migraine medicine, just in case. (Turns out I did not need it, I got a few headaches but no migraines.)

I have sen my neurologist on and off for over 25 years, she comes highly recommended from a doctor friend of mine, is Ivy League trained and I have always found her thorough and a very good clinician.  She is a little but, I don’t know, eccentric.

I had not seen her since being diagnosed with multiple myeloma, but she is the one who discovered my olfactory cortex meningioma (see Incidental Findings). So after a long review of my past and more recent medical history, a physical examination, etc. (everything neurologically is fine!). She sits across her desk and looks at me and says, “You know, you look really good.” I reply, “I know, everyone says that – nurses, medical assistants, doctors, specialists, attendings in the hospital, everyone.” She says, “I don’t think you know what they mean. Some people are made of bad stuff and they get sick and they look bad, but you’re sick and you look really good, you’re made of good stuff. I think you’ll be o.k.”

So after a not very technical evaluation, I guess that’s a good thing, I just might be made of good stuff, even though I have bad stuff going on.

My good stuff best be there for me as I approach the coming weeks. I have learned something recently, mostly talking to nurses (nurses are da’ bomb, by the way, so full of great information). The “stem cell transplant” is not actually the treatment for the cancer.  The treatment, to get rid of the cancer cells in my blood is the two days of high dose melphalan. This will “kill” both the bad cells in my blood as well as the good cells, hence the need for the stem cells. The stem cell portion of the treatment is actually called “peripheral stem cell rescue”. The stem cells come in to save the day and get your blood counts back into a normal range.

There are other side effects besides the low blood counts: nausea, vomiting (maybe for longer than the hospital stay), diarrhea, mucositis (sores along the digestive tract), heartburn espohagitis, risk of infection and fever.

This is the schedule:

Saturday, June 13th (afternoon or early evening: Admission to Brigham & Women’s Hospital
Sunday, June 14th (Day -2): First melphalan dose
Monday, June 15th (Day -1): Second melphalan dose
Tuesday, June 16th (Day 0): Stem cells reinfused

And then recovery in the hospital Days +1 through +14.

Days +6 through +10 are likely the days I will feel the worst.

Day +5 neupogen injections start and about a week later my white blood cell counts will start to climb as my stem cells mature.

Day +14 is my potential discharge date (June 30th). And then it is home where “the bulk of my recovery will take place” with diet restrictions for 30 days after discharge and infection control restrictions for 90 days after discharge.

Everyone’s side effects and recovery are different.

Here is to my “good stuff” doing it’s thing!