The Hair Story

I have been meaning to write this for a while now. And I’m not sure why I even feel I need to write it. Maybe it’s because losing your hair is such an emblem of being a cancer patient. Or maybe it’s because my hair is a big part of me, literally, my hair is typically gigantic.

So, the prospect of losing it, was for me like for most cancer patients, something I was not looking forward to.

First, to prepare, the trying on of wigs:

I thought it might be fun to try to be a blonde, nope. Shorter wigs are easier to care for, but it just didn’t feel right and soon enough I would have very short hair! I went with the Raquel Welch “Showstopper”. Something about a Raquel Welch wig made me smile.

I learned an important and expensive lesson after I purchased my wig. Connecticut has a statute that requires insurance companies to cover up to $350 towards the purchase of a wig when your oncologist writes a prescription for a “cranial prosthesis”. My wig cost $478. When I submitted my claim it was denied. When I questioned the denial I was told that I had purchased my wig “out of network”. I had never even considered that there would be In network places to purchase a wig. Anyone going through this – read your insurance coverage carefully!

So, after my DCEP treatment, and before my stem cell transplant I was told my hair would likely start to fall out in about two weeks. So I waited. And then this happened.

And this is what it looked like:

The next day I eventually cut it short to my head and put on my wig to go to my stepdaughter Tess’ junior prom pictures. No one I saw even batted an eye.

I found sleeping on that short hair actually hurt. Somehow the short hairs are pushed against the grain of the way they normally lay and it HURTS, a lot. So on Mother’s Day my daughter Sarah came over and we shaved my head. Just like that. Wearing the wig took some getting used to, for instance in this Mother’s Day photo it is clearly falling too low on my forehead!

11182723_10152952705280345_3714099827268388439_o

I wore the wig to work every day. And everyone thought my hair looked so great! (Very few people at work, a handful really, knew I had cancer.) But wigs are uncomfortable, they itch, they tangle and they are hot, so at home it was often just my bare scalp.

And then there were the buffs and hats.

And everyone’s favorite the hat/hair!

Occasionally, I revealed my baldness in public.

But mostly I wore the wig, itchiness, tangles and all. At one point I even had to pay for a “haircut” for the wig! I needed to make it a touch shorter so it wouldn’t tangle so much on the bottom.

And then the growing out began.

Where it went from chic, to really not chic at all. My son Kyle was always the most brutally honest (not politically correct to share all the things he called me)!

At one point it was feeling oh-so-not-chic-at-all and in desperation I went for a haircut, where she thinned my hair in spots so it would lose some of it’s bushiness. It worked for a bit, although the growing out of the thinned layers was not so great – not sure I would recommend it.

And then there were the difficult times, which for the most part I found humorous (do excuse my mascara circled morning eyes in lots of these, morning hair was often the most “special”).

But one of my all-time favorites was when I sent a bad hair day photo to my nephew Hunter and he came back with the perfect response in seconds!

And I am still waiting for a great blowout…

In the meantime, some good hair days, some bad hair days…

But, really every day is a great day—and to be fair I’ll always have crazy hair!

IMG_4916(1).JPG

 

 

 

Coffee, Peanut Butter, Wine, Buffs and the Ocean

My stay at Dana Farber/Brigham & Women’s ended Sunday night with what felt like a miracle.  Not unlike the story of the Chanukah oil/menorah, only in reverse. The last bag of chemotherapy was scheduled to end at 11:00 p.m. At almost 8:30 I decided to start packing up my belongings, just to pass the time. As I was dragging my IV pole around the room, I glanced at the furthest most tube and saw that it was no longer dripping – the chem bag (covered by a colored sleeve to keep it protected from the light) was done all except for what was in the last piece of tubing! We were home right around midnight – total score! (The nurses jokingly teased that I had changed the settings to get out sooner.)

Since getting home I have felt pretty well, nothing terrible, some nausea, some fatigue, mostly just not feeling like myself. Case in point, I have absolutely no desire to have, what most people consider my three staples: coffee, peanut butter and wine,  It is the strangest thing.

On Monday, worried that my hair would start falling out in clumps at any moment (I am unclear as to the actual timing), I went to an outdoorsy store and bought a buff, just so I would have something on my head (see video here on how to wear a buff) in case I suddenly looked ridiculous. I chose a nice neutral shade, a cream that would go with everything. I put it on, and actually thought it looked pretty good, that is until I realized that the nice neutral cream color, absent my dark curls sticking out, will just look like a skull cap, precisely the look I am trying to avoid! (I exchanged it yesterday for a deep purple with fuchsia print.)

In other news, I fainted for the first time in my life on Tuesday. I was getting my first blood draw from my PICC line. It took a bit of time and the nurse was flushing the lines several times and I was feeling nauseous from the smell of the heparin. I told the nurse I was feeling nauseous and lightheaded. She told me to take slow deep breaths, which I did. And then I told her I was feeling really lightheaded. And then, that I thought I was going to throw up. She held a pan in front of me and told me to take slow deep breaths and look at her,  I felt terrible and all I could think was, “That’s it?  I’m in a hospital, with a nurse and all you got is ‘slow deep breaths’ and ‘keep looking at me’!?!? Really??” The next thing I knew I was dreaming, a rather pleasant dream (although I could not recall the details and my sister advises that likely it was a hallucination as opposed to a dream). And then I woke to my name being called and very surprised that I was not home snoozing in bed.  Apparently, I was passed out for about two minutes. But, some IV fluids, anti-nausea meds and a ride home I was fine.

I am continuing to wrap my head around the details, appointments, restrictions, etc. of my upcoming stem cell transplant (SCT),  I spoke to the SCT coordinator today about several things, but I was keen to find out if she thought I would be able to go on my annual vacation to Hampton Bays, NY in August.  And….she did not think that would be a problem!  And not only that but she added that I would be able to swim in the ocean, which is probably my favorite thing to do in the world.

Life is good.  It really is.