Back in the Saddle

I had three photo shoots this past weekend and I started working from home on Monday. It feels good. I feel good. I can’t return to the office until September 16th, wish it were sooner.

In other non-cancer news. Two weeks ago I had my MRI of my olfactory cortex meningioma (see my post Incidental Findings) done and last week Sarah and I went to see Dr. Sisti at Columbia-Presbyterian, CD in hand. It had been a year since my last MRI. There had been no growth the 6 months prior to that so he said we could go a year. Much to my surprise and my chagrin he told me it had grown, not a lot, but it had definitely grown and will need to come out. When he heard I had just had a stem cell transplant he said we would not do it this year. But still, it will need to come out at some point.

“Coming out” involves a craniotomy, it is not actually brain surgery, as they do not go into the brain, but it is skull surgery. There is a risk of damaging the olfactory nerves, in which case I would lose my sense of smell/taste. It is a 3-4 day hospital stay and a 30-day recovery. They make the same cut in your hairline as they do for a face lift, except you don’t get the face lift!

Oh, and I almost forgot, my first day working from home, I lost power. I ended up working in my local Starbucks for three hours.

I kid you not, it is truly always something 🙂

Published by

Heather

I never thought I’d be writing a blog, and certainly not one that is all about me, and yet, here I am. For me life has always been interesting, not mundane, not always exciting per se, but hardly ever the norm. When I say “It’s always something…” I don’t hear it as my life is a mess, it;s always something. It’s more of life is challenging and evolving and messy and inspiring and wondrous, it’s always something. I grew up in suburbia, buy my grandfather was the head of the Communist Party in the U.S. I was raised keeping that a secret, so that was something. I am tall, always have been, really tall (6’1″), I was taller than every human being in my elementary school when I was in 6th grade, that is still something. My parents divorced in my teens. I got a full basketball scholarship to Duke University. I married my high school basketball coach, 18 years my senior. I raised a stepson. I had two amazing kids of my own. We had a multicultural household, secular christian (I guess that’s what I would call it, you know Santa and the Easter Bunny) and Judaism, I used to say if it was a holiday – we celebrated it! We were uber involved in our community, mostly through youth athletics, coaching, managing and spectating. Our kids grew up, I started a photography business on the side (I hope to share some photos here) and we planned to travel a bit together, went to Portugal for our 25th anniversary and then my husband was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer, initially they gave him 5 years, but he only survived for a little over two. I was going to say lived, but really, it was more like surviving. That, indeed, was something. I became a widow at 49. It was the worst thing that ever happened to me. But, then it was something in another way. I relearned who I was. You don’t realize how much of you becomes a combination of you and another person in a relationship. And not in a bad way, it is essential, and you don’t lose yourself, you just evolve. And I found myself suddenly alone, and learning about myself and who I had become over the years, what was just me, and what was part of who we were together. Which in retrospect, was probably hardest on those around me who had gotten used to the old me, or never even knew the original me. A year later I found love again. Sold my home of 31 years and moved closer to work. I became more fit, ate more healthfully and was amazed that I could be happy, truly happy, in the wake, no not wake, but the shadow of such profound grief. And that is truly something, something amazing and unexpected. And then, through some routine blood work in April 2014, and a visit to a hematologist and bone marrow biopsy in May, I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. And so, yes, for me right now it’s multiple myeloma, but that is not all, there are still highs and joys, and the mundane and the rest, but something like cancer does cast a pretty long shadow.

5 thoughts on “Back in the Saddle”

  1. WTF!! In any case, I am really glad to hear that you are back in the saddle again cowgirl!! :)) I’ve missed you around here. See you soon.

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    1. What a great beginning of doing photo shoots and working! You have endured so much with strength and courage. Not what you needed after everything!!

      Like

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